YouTube – Georgia, wine region Kakheti

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YouTube – Georgia, wine region Kakheti.

Georgia’s first ever Decanter World Wine Awards trophy

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Liza Bagrationi from the Badagoni wine company talks to Decanter about winning Georgia’s first ever Decanter World Wine Awards trophy. Interview at the Royal Opera House in Covent Garden, London

via YouTube – Decanter World Wine Awards 2010.

Tradition, Tech Clash Over Wine

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Some see the science-driven changes as a bad thing because they have sometimes increased yield at the expense of quality. But others think these naysayers are snobby traditionalists worried that high-quality, complex wines will become cheaper.

via Tradition, Tech Clash Over Wine.

The next big thing

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Georgia should be near the top of the list for anyone looking for “the next big thing”   The Drinks Business – August 2010.

Georgian wine the first Georgian National Wine Competition,

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My week in Georgia introduced me to a people with a proud history, a deep-felt love of wine, and an appetite to address the problems facing their industry. In a world where eminent experts can’t tell first growth Bordeaux from Californian Cabernet, there is no doubt these unique grapes from a rich cultural winemaking heritage have potential: especially the potential to excite jaded consumer palates. more

Vino in anfora georgiano

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Just one example is the partnership between the Georgian Wine in Jars Presidium and the Tuscan association Cammino Autoctuve, bringing together small-scale wine producers who are preserving native grapes and flavors in two very different parts of the world.

Is Amphora (Kvevri) the New Barrique? (The Emperor’s New Clothes)

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‘ One wine style we have been arguing about for years* are the amphora wines. Often examples of so-called natural wines, produced according to Bio-dynamic rules, these have been fermented and/or aged in amphora, usually buried in the ground. Using amphora for not only transport, as the Romans have been doing it for thousand of years, but also for fermenting and aging, we learned, is also an ancient method. It might just as well be the first method: modern-day Georgia in Asia, the cradle of vine and winemaking, was where Gravner learned about this method. You might have seen some wines of this type – they are also called orange wines. They play the thin line between being complex and being oxidated, usually offer ripe (but not sweet) fruit aromas and a certain stony or metallic feeling, along with tannins, which are unusual for white grapes. I have been liking them from the above mentioned chance start, where as my husband, a certified sommelier as well, has usually been on the skeptical side – not outright refusing them, but rather thinking they might prove to age very well but are not too enjoyable at the moment’   Read more here

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