An ancient technique, probably adopted first by the people living in today’s Georgia, namely those to whom recent archaeological discoveries attribute the spread of “Vitis Vinifera” throughout continental Europe. Several thousand years later, this methodology has been rediscovered and many winemaking realities have launched themselves into this adventure; in fact, this type of container allows micro-oxygenation just like wooden barrels, but unlike the latter, it does not release aromas, allowing the wine to express the varietal characteristics of the grape.

There are many producers who use ceramics, stoneware or other mysterious mixtures for their production of wine jars. I believe that the real Jars or Amphorae, wherever they are made in the world, are those produced in terracotta. The rest are only copies … which, by all means, can work very well, but have little to do with the ancient tradition and the charm of the authentic terracotta vessels. Even the results are quite different, in fact terracotta “breathes” while jars made from ceramics, stoneware or similar, are closer to concrete or steel. Today, terracotta amphorae producers are springing up in America, France, China, etc. I think it’s great that a material like terracotta, which seemed destined to almost disappear has become a protagonist once more!

Five questions for…Leonardo Parisi, producer of terracotta amphorae for wine