An ancient technique, probably adopted first by the people living in today’s Georgia, namely those to whom recent archaeological discoveries attribute the spread of “Vitis Vinifera” throughout continental Europe.

Leave a comment

An ancient technique, probably adopted first by the people living in today’s Georgia, namely those to whom recent archaeological discoveries attribute the spread of “Vitis Vinifera” throughout continental Europe. Several thousand years later, this methodology has been rediscovered and many winemaking realities have launched themselves into this adventure; in fact, this type of container allows micro-oxygenation just like wooden barrels, but unlike the latter, it does not release aromas, allowing the wine to express the varietal characteristics of the grape.

There are many producers who use ceramics, stoneware or other mysterious mixtures for their production of wine jars. I believe that the real Jars or Amphorae, wherever they are made in the world, are those produced in terracotta. The rest are only copies … which, by all means, can work very well, but have little to do with the ancient tradition and the charm of the authentic terracotta vessels. Even the results are quite different, in fact terracotta “breathes” while jars made from ceramics, stoneware or similar, are closer to concrete or steel. Today, terracotta amphorae producers are springing up in America, France, China, etc. I think it’s great that a material like terracotta, which seemed destined to almost disappear has become a protagonist once more!

Five questions for…Leonardo Parisi, producer of terracotta amphorae for wine

Oregon made qvevri

Leave a comment

Andrew and Annedria Beckham are the owners of Beckham Estate Vineyards in Sherwood, Oregon, where Andrew is the winemaker. Unique to Beckham Estate Vineyards, Andrew Beckham blends his two passions, wine and art, using Amphorae. Amphorae are terra cotta vessels used as part of an ancient tradition of winemaking in terra cotta vessels, thought to originate in the Republic of Georgia. This is part two of the Beckham oral history interviews. This interview takes place at Union Wine Co. in Tualatin, Oregon where Beckham stores and makes his wine. In this interview, Beckham tells about his experiences using Amphorae. To access more material in this collection, please visit Digital Commons at http://digitalcommons.linfield.edu/ow…. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BB1MW2kB3a4

A Comparison of In-Amphorae ( Qvevri ) Winemaking to Barrels/Barriques in Chardonnay Wine

Leave a comment

Selected Results

Chemical analysis of the Chardonnay grapes at harvest resulted in the following values: 21.9oBrix sugar content, 7.60g/L titratable acidity, 2.25g/L malic acid, and 3.17 pH.
Only the dry extract and volatile acidity were statistically significantly different between the different wines (though there were some value differences that didn’t quite make it to statistical significance).
The researchers confirmed the higher dry extract in amphorae wines was due to the pomace cap maceration process.
The amphorae wines showed higher volatile acidity, straw color, and perception of tannin compared to the barrel and barrique wines.
Barrel and barrique wines showed higher vanilla flavor than amphorae wines.
Amphorae wines showed lower titratable acidity than the barrel or barrique wines (not statistically significant).
Volatile acidity was higher in barrique wines than barrel wines.
Malolactic fermentation was complete much faster in amphorae wines than barrel or barrique wines.
This again, according to the researchers, might be explained by the pomace cap, since there might have been wild lactic acid bacteria present, thus helping the process along faster than without the extra bacteria.
Lactic acid levels were more or less similar between the three wines at the end of the winemaking process.
Sensory analysis revealed:
Amphorae wines had a “mature scent”, fewer green characteristics, and fewer Chardonnay varietal characteristics. Tannins were “elegant” and the wine had a “pleasing taste” (higher than the barrel or barrique wines). A spicy scent was noted, as well as a lack of vanilla character.
Barrique wines had a lot of vanilla tones, and exhibited strong Chardonnay varietal characteristics. Characteristics noted were “fresh, harmony, and a remarkable woody flavor”. The panelists made a note to possibly blend this wine with the other wines to take the woody/oak characteristics down a notch.
Barrel wines possessed the most Chardonnay varietal characteristics, and were considered to be the most balanced with spice, light oak, and vanilla character in addition to the fruit character. Panelists noted it was “full, balanced, fruity” and had a “persistent flavor”.

Concrete helps to understand terroirs

Leave a comment

One of his first steps was to replace stainless steel and wood fermentors with large, tulip-shaped concrete vats for all three wines, which are fermented with wild yeasts.

“With two years of aging in barrel,” says Ruini, “I don’t want to add more wood. Concrete is neutral. Steel has a reducing effect on wine—it’s not the best.”

Are natural winemakers in denial about mousiness?

Leave a comment

http://www.themorningclaret.com/2017/are-natural-winemakers-in-denial-about-mousiness/

 

Some interesting ideas about amber wines

Leave a comment

Trelab presented a poster about ongoing Qvevri research at the recent Washington Association of Wine Grape Growers annual meeting.

Leave a comment

Trelab presented a poster about ongoing Qvevri research at the recent Washington Association of Wine Grape Growers annual meeting.

via The Qvevri Project.

Characterization of Selected Organic and Mineral Components of Qvevri Wines

Leave a comment

Characterization of Selected Organic and Mineral Components of Qvevri Wines

via Characterization of Selected Organic and Mineral Components of Qvevri Wines.

the 2 d Qvevri Wine Symposium in Georgia – Four Monasteries and no funerals: Georgian Adventures

Leave a comment

Qvevri Wine Symposium in Georgia. Some were writers and photographers, some were winemakers who used clay pots in their vinification, and others were grizzled wine trade pros with a natural swerve to their step. The trip was organised to a t, balancing the needs of education, culture-vulturing as well as copious spiritual – and spirituous – refreshment. One can say without doubt that coming into contact with another culture teaches you about your own.

via Four Monasteries and no funerals: Georgian Adventures.

Marks and Spencer serves up orange wine surprise from Eastern Europe | Mail Online

1 Comment

Wine expert from M&S, Jeneve Williams, said: ‘Most ‘normal’ white wines are produced by quickly separating the juice from the seeds and skins, keeping a pale colour.‘Orange wines, or amber wines as they are often called are actually white wines produced more like reds – with prolonged contact with the crushed grape skins and seeds, resulting in a deeper colour from the pigments found in grape skins. ‘When visiting Georgia earlier this year to blend new wines, we were excited to try the style – and were impressed with the complexity of the wines.

via Marks and Spencer serves up orange wine surprise from Eastern Europe | Mail Online.

Older Entries

%d bloggers like this: