» Gregory Alonzo: The Georgian Feast: Supra, the Tamada, and Sweet Wines Photos below story » Eve’s Wine 101

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What is a supra? This is the Georgian word for a “feast.” Food and drink are especially important to the cultures of the Caucasus. The supra is comprised of a vast array dishes oftentimes representing the various regions throughout the country. Let’s not forget the wine. The supra is also accompanied by large amounts of wine and a dinner can last for several hours.During a Georgian supra, the role of the “tamada or toastmaster,” is an important and honored tradition. Since the dinner is more of an event rather than a meal, the tamada is expected to keep the festivities moving along and ensure that the wine keeps flowing. Since the tamada is in essence an entertainer, it is not unusual for our toastmaster to sing songs or recite poetry, and of course, make the obligatory toasts.

via » Gregory Alonzo: The Georgian Feast: Supra, the Tamada, and Sweet Wines Photos below story » Eve's Wine 101.

Wine tours in Georgia

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The region tour allows you to visit a number of Georgian wineries, taste the wines from the modern wineries or home made wine and experience the people and landscape where the grapes are harvested. Visit the flourishing vineyards and wineries of Kakheti and enjoy the delicious wine and warm hospitality of the local population!The richest wine-growing and wine-making region of Georgia, populated with hospitable, openhearted and straightforward people, who live surrounded by mountain chains, old castles, beautiful churches and drink wine as early as mother’s milk – Kakheti province is a “must do”.

via Wine tour.

TRAVEL: Jews in Georgia

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I was looking forward to visiting Kutaisi, the second biggest city in Georgia, and I was not disappointed. David the Builder lived there, and, according to legend, Jason sailed in the Argonaut on the local Rioni River to get the Golden Fleece. The Bagrati Cathedral was built at the end of the 10th century and is worth a visit. Nearby are the ruins of a military fortification, a small church and an 11th century wine house where you can still see kvevri, or clay wine vessels, in the ground. Each kvevri is about three and a half feet across. Our guide said that surely the Jews in Georgia used this traditional wine-making technique.

via TRAVEL: Jews and Jeeps | San Diego Jewish Journal.

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