kvevri — Food Stories

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They get these massive clay pots called qvevri, and they bury them in the ground. Then they whack everything juice, skins, stems in there, seal it up with clay and let it all separate out. The wine is then drawn off the top very carefully using a special jug on a stick. They use a really old grape variety called Rkatsiteli which comes out freakin’ orange! Then there’s another one, which is red and called Saperavi. They’re both native to Georgia. The first time I tasted the orange wine, I was quite taken aback; that stuff is just totally unlike any wine I’ve ever tasted; kinda funky but, you know what? I got into it. By the end of that trip I think we were all a bit Georgian.

via kvevri — Food Stories.

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2008 Pheasant’s Tears Rkatsiteli, Republic of Georgia – Vinography: A Wine Blog

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For anyone who has yet to try an orange wine, this is as good a place to start as any, and the price is right. While not as complex as some of the efforts produced by Gravner and others, it is delicious and possesses all the wonderful qualities that led me to fall in love with orange wines the moment I had my first — exotic aromas, mysterious tannins, and wonderful abilities to complement food.You’ll have to be the judge as to whether it lives up to the winery’s namesake — the wine that was so good it could make a pheasant cry.Tasting Notes:Earning its local nickname as “fire wine” this bright, nearly neon orange glass smells of exotic flowers, candle wax, candied apricots and just a hint of tomato. In the mouth the wine has a wonderful creaminess that is offset by somewhat stiff tannins and bright acidity. That creaminess leans towards a waxiness as flavors of orange peel, fresh ripe apricots, and exotic spices swirl in a beautifully textured concerto. The finish is long and features that waxy quality along with floral notes and the grip of tannins. Excellent, and exotic. Will benefit from decanting. 12.5% alcohol.

via 2008 Pheasant's Tears Rkatsiteli, Republic of Georgia – Vinography: A Wine Blog.

“A churi is a vessel made of clay: qvevri, kvibari, kotso, khalani, dergi, lagvni, lagvnari and the like.”

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Qvevri-making used to be the leading branch of the five branches of pottery in Georgia. Not long ago, qvevris in Georgia were widely used, however today their use and production are limited –only a few artisans are still master qvevri-makers. Qvevri making, especially for large-capacity qvevris, requires great skill, experience and expense. To illustrate that qvevri-making is a very complex branch, it can be contrasted to that of the brick-maker, who could freely make tiles; and to a potter, who could freely make the traditional bread ovens called tonne. However the skills needed to make qvevris have always been considered a higher and distinct art in Georgian ceramics. In the past qvevris wer

via Making Wine in Qvevri: a Unique Georgian Tradition | Marani.

Experiment Update: Pressing Grapes out of our Amphora / Tinaja / Qvevri | Organic Wine Journal

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So in Spetember, when we harvested the Malvar grapes from our new vineyard in Villarejo, we filled up the amphora with manually crushed grapes, sealed it, and basically left it alone. We didn’t add any substances at all no SO2 and we just punched down the cap every so often until the skins didn’t float any more. Anyway, that’s 5 months of skin contact.During this time, the skins, pips, lees, etc all sank to the bottom and the top became liquid – a golden transparent liquid.. Every so often we would open up the ‘lid’ a plastic sheet tied down tightly and we would taste the wine to see how it was developing.

via Experiment Update: Pressing Grapes out of our Amphora / Tinaja / Qvevri | Organic Wine Journal.

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