Archaeologists in Georgia discover graves from 3rd century BC | Democracy & Freedom Watch

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xperts say, qvevri burials were popular during pagan period in the country, when dead a body was buried in a qvevri, a large pitcher normally half-buried in the ground and used for wine-making.

via Archaeologists in Georgia discover graves from 3rd century BC | Democracy & Freedom Watch.

» Gregory Alonzo: The Georgian Feast: Supra, the Tamada, and Sweet Wines Photos below story » Eve’s Wine 101

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What is a supra? This is the Georgian word for a “feast.” Food and drink are especially important to the cultures of the Caucasus. The supra is comprised of a vast array dishes oftentimes representing the various regions throughout the country. Let’s not forget the wine. The supra is also accompanied by large amounts of wine and a dinner can last for several hours.During a Georgian supra, the role of the “tamada or toastmaster,” is an important and honored tradition. Since the dinner is more of an event rather than a meal, the tamada is expected to keep the festivities moving along and ensure that the wine keeps flowing. Since the tamada is in essence an entertainer, it is not unusual for our toastmaster to sing songs or recite poetry, and of course, make the obligatory toasts.

via » Gregory Alonzo: The Georgian Feast: Supra, the Tamada, and Sweet Wines Photos below story » Eve's Wine 101.

Live from the London Wine Fairs: Exploring Emerging and Lesser-Known Countries | PALATE PRESS

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Between the hypertraditional producers of amphora wines that were displayed by large delegations at the RAW Fair and Real Wine Fair and the more modern producers at LIWF, there is a whole universe of wine to discover in Georgia. Whites from rkatstiteli, mainly made in every style from crisp and fresh to aromatic and round to the whole different ballgame of qvevri/amphora wines. Saperavi reds were often impressive, balanced, with a good spiciness and freshness.

via Live from the London Wine Fairs: Exploring Emerging and Lesser-Known Countries | PALATE PRESS.

Natural wines | Wine Articles | People & Places | decanter.com

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There are natural wine producers as far afield as the uS and New Zealand, as well as in lesser-known regions such as Slovenia, Georgia and Serbia. Paris, New York, San Francisco and Tokyo are mad about the movement and London is now close on their heels.Given current media hype, natural wine might seem like the new kid on the block and, in the sense of a movement gathering momentum, that’s true.Natural wines themselves, however, have existed since time immemorial. When wine was first made 8,000 years ago, it was not made using packets of yeasts, vitamins, enzymes, Mega Purple, reverse osmosis, cryoextraction or powdered tannins – some of the many additives and processes used in winemaking worldwide.The wines of these bygone days were natural: they were made from crushed grapes that fermented into wine.

via Natural wines | Wine Articles | People & Places | decanter.com.

“A churi is a vessel made of clay: qvevri, kvibari, kotso, khalani, dergi, lagvni, lagvnari and the like.”

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Qvevri-making used to be the leading branch of the five branches of pottery in Georgia. Not long ago, qvevris in Georgia were widely used, however today their use and production are limited –only a few artisans are still master qvevri-makers. Qvevri making, especially for large-capacity qvevris, requires great skill, experience and expense. To illustrate that qvevri-making is a very complex branch, it can be contrasted to that of the brick-maker, who could freely make tiles; and to a potter, who could freely make the traditional bread ovens called tonne. However the skills needed to make qvevris have always been considered a higher and distinct art in Georgian ceramics. In the past qvevris wer

via Making Wine in Qvevri: a Unique Georgian Tradition | Marani.

Spanish Qvevri: Tinajas and Orzas

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Aljibe Almeria: Spanish Utility Pottery: Tinajas and Orzas.

The FINANCIAL – “Some of the 2-3 Trillion USD of Investment Capital Available in the US Could End Up in Georgia”

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Georgia is an attractive tourist destination in general, but for US tourists to travel to Georgia only, they need to be offered a very unique experience. I think wine tourism with elements of cultural adventure through polyphonic music, food and sightseeing, offers such an experience. But Georgia still needs to develop the necessary infrastructure to receive a sizable number of tourists. I just had group of fourteen American friends in Kakheti for a wine tasting experience and we couldn’t find accommodation in Telavi since all the hotel rooms were booked.

via The FINANCIAL – “Some of the 2-3 Trillion USD of Investment Capital Available in the US Could End Up in Georgia”.

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